Tag Archive | Trees

Beech Bark Disease Severity vs. Tree diversity

Beech Bark Disease Severity vs. Tree diversity

The American beech tree (Fagus grandifolia) is a species of canopy tree found in the northeastern U.S and Canada, growing in mixed deciduous, hardwood, and temperate forests (Zhang et al., 2015). In the Morgan Arboretum, which is dominated primary by sugar maple and beech, these beech tree plays a significant role in the ecosystem by […]

Hay Scented Fern and its Effect on Sugar Maple Trees in the Morgan Arboretum

Hay Scented Fern and its Effect on Sugar Maple Trees in the Morgan Arboretum

Overview: Hay-scented fern (Dennstaedtia punctilobula) is an invasive, rhizomatous, perennial fern native to North America (Hippensteel and Bowersox, 1995). This species grows in many different conditions and spreads itself by dispersing its spores with the help of wind. This perennial fern is about 1-3’ tall, with deciduous leaves that are erect to ascending. It is […]

Eutypella Canker Disease of Maples

Eutypella Canker Disease of Maples

The sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is a hardwood species native to eastern Canada. It is significant in canadian culture and economy. Its leaf is featured on the national flag and its sap can be processed into maple syrup, a valuable commodity.  Canada alone manufactures around 80% of the world’s maple syrup. Most of it is […]

Intraspecific Competition within the Sugar Maple Species, Acer Saccharum, through the Assessment of Population Density and Size

Intraspecific Competition within the Sugar Maple Species, Acer Saccharum, through the Assessment of Population Density and Size

There are approximately 150 species of maple trees located within the Northern Hemisphere, with 10 of them native to North America (NRCAN-2015). One of the most commonly grown species of maple is the Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum). Sugar maple is a keystone species, meaning it is a significant ecological element of Northern hardwood forests, like […]

Comparative Study of Lichen Populations

Comparative Study of Lichen Populations

Lichens: they’re very common, but more often than not go unnoticed by the casual observer. What you miss seeing in these unobtrusive composite organisms is their sensitivity to air pollutants that makes them valuable bioindicators. To begin with, lichens are formed through the symbiotic association of a photosynthetic algae and a fungus (Richardson, 1992). The […]

Beechdrops at the Morgan Arboretum

Beechdrops at the Morgan Arboretum

Physical Description Beechdrops (Epifagus virginiana) are annual flowering plants which parasitize beech tree roots all over Eastern North America. They completely lack chlorophyll and have smooth, brownish stems and branches that reach a height of about 30cm (Musselman, 1982).  During our own observations, they were very easy to miss under all the autumn leaf litter, […]

Leaf Litter Invertebrates of the Morgan Arboretum

Leaf Litter Invertebrates of the Morgan Arboretum

Invertebrates, while small, play an integral role in our ecosystem in the St. Lawrence Lowlands. In leaf litter, they aid greatly in the decomposition of organic matter, as cited by Vasconcelos and Laurance in their article on soil fauna (2005). Invertebrates are animals that lack a backbone, but this is where most of the obvious […]